• Upcoming Events

    Monday 11/8
    Peter Beinart
    "Israel: Have we lost that loving feeling, and can we get it back?"
    5-7pm
    Davis Auditorium
    Sturm Hall

    Monday 11/8
    The Muslim Student Association is hosting an Eid Mubarak dinner from 6-8 pm at the Korbel Cyber Cafe.

    Wednesday 11/10
    A Faculty Panel will discuss different issues surrounding the Occupy Wallstreet movement.
    Noon in the Cyber Cafe

  • Contact Us

    Cliff Martin
    clifton.martin86@gmail.com

    Brett Schneider
    schneider.brett.a@gmail.com

    Doug Garrison
    garrisondh@gmail.com

    Kara Kingma
    klkingma@ole.augie.edu

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 19 other followers

Small protests in Libya

Add Libya to the list of states with protests, according to this BBC News article.  The story says that protests began overnight in Libya’s second city, Benghazi, when news spread of

the arrest of Fathi Terbil, who represents relatives of more than 1,000 prisoners allegedly massacred by security forces in Tripoli’s Abu Salim jail in 1996. He was later said to have been freed.

What appears to have occurred is that people took to the streets to express anger of the arrest.  Then the protest took on an anti-government edge and grew in size.  Next, pro-Qaddafi citizens clashed with the group, left, and then Libyan police forces stepped in to break up the protest.

It is unclear how large the protest was.  The state is saying that the protesters numbered around 150.

“We will not permit that at all, and we call on Libyans to voice their issues through existing channels, even if it is to call for the downfall of the government,” said the official, who was not identified.

Colonel Muammar al Qaddafi really is eccentric.  From his all-female team of bodyguards, to his tents, to his dress, to his penchant for flatulence when interviewing with Western media, he is really an oddball.  He is also a dictator, having controled Libya since 1969, making him the longest tenured ruler in the Middle East.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: