• Upcoming Events

    Monday 11/8
    Peter Beinart
    "Israel: Have we lost that loving feeling, and can we get it back?"
    5-7pm
    Davis Auditorium
    Sturm Hall

    Monday 11/8
    The Muslim Student Association is hosting an Eid Mubarak dinner from 6-8 pm at the Korbel Cyber Cafe.

    Wednesday 11/10
    A Faculty Panel will discuss different issues surrounding the Occupy Wallstreet movement.
    Noon in the Cyber Cafe

  • Contact Us

    Cliff Martin
    clifton.martin86@gmail.com

    Brett Schneider
    schneider.brett.a@gmail.com

    Doug Garrison
    garrisondh@gmail.com

    Kara Kingma
    klkingma@ole.augie.edu

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 19 other followers

Iraqi youth frustrated

The New York Times has an article up today detailing the challenge facing Iraqi youth seeking to become larger stakeholders in their government.  The article suggests that the current political elite have already consolidated power such that accessibility to newcomers is nonexistent.  Part of locking up power is controlling the security forces:

The stubborn insurgency creates a space for leaders like Mr. Maliki to centralize power, especially over the security forces, critics say. For example, Mr. Allawi said in an interview that as part of the power-sharing agreement to form the government last year, it was “agreed that the units which are attached to the prime minister should be disengaged.” That has not happened.

Still, every cloud has a silver lining, and in this case the optomist points out that the concerns of gaining political power and protesting did not exist under Saddam Hussein.

But it is a measure of progress that these students can speak out freely and join in street protests. One small result is that bars reopened in Baghdad after being closed in January. “I do not want to be so negative about it,” said Shereen Ahmed, 19, who is studying to be a teacher in Anbar Province. “Yes, we are witnessing a small part of democracy now from what we see from the protests in Iraq. When Saddam was here, not even one Iraqi could go out in protest because he would be killed.”

For anyone who needs a topic to write a paper on, it would be interesting to know how exactly the Arab Protest Movement of 2011 has been received in Iraq, where the dictator is already gone and democracy has been cast upon the country.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: